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Sea Buckthorn

According to legend, in the 12th Century BC, ancient Far East warriors turned their horses out to die after a battle. They were shocked when the horses came back days later rejuvenated with shiny coats. The miracle was traced to the sea buckthorn plant.

From then on it was known as “Life Oil.” And today, modern science continues to confirm what the ancients knew about this incredible plant.

  • It contains over 190 different nutrients, including every vitamin known to man[1]
  • It’s one of the only natural sources for the rare Omega-7 fatty acid,[2] which has been found to aid weight loss,[3] help prevent type 2 diabetes,[4] and improve the look and feel of skin[5]
  • Its impact on skin health has led it to be used as an effective treatment for burns and dermatitis, and it’s anti-aging power will transform your skin[6]

 

Cardiovascular Health

Sea buckthorn has been found to lower blood pressure in rats,[7] and to prevent blood pressure from rising during exercise in hypertensive humans.[8] The seed oil has been found to have vasorelaxant properties (to relax blood vessels thereby lowering blood pressure).[9]

Rats with hypertension fed Omega-7 had a significantly improved survival rate.[10]

In addition, Sea Buckthorn has been used for centuries in Traditional Chinese Medicine to treat a multitude of disorders, including cardiovascular disease.[11]

Metabolic Health

Contains the rare Omega-7 fatty acid. This healthy fat has been shown in studies to act as a hormone, signaling muscle cells to react better to insulin.[12] It seems also to inhibit the ability of fat cells to store fat.

Mice fed the same high fat diet had significantly lower body weights if also given sea buckthorn in studies.[13]

Women who took sea buckthorn for 30 days saw a “statistically significant” reduction in waist circumference with no other changes to diet and exercise.[14]

Skin Health

Omega-7 is a component of our skin, and Sea buckthorn can nourish the skin when taken orally.[15]

In one clinical trial, supplementing with it was shown to significantly increase something called glycerophospholipids in skin.[16] (In other words it made skin more supple – which means less sagging and fewer wrinkles.) In others, it has been shown to regenerate tissue, healing burns[17] and other wounds.[18]

It blocks UV radiation.[19] It heals and restores skin injuries. It combats rosacea and dermatitis like nobody’s business.[20]

Choosing A Supplement

The studies referenced above have been conducted both on oils from the berries and seeds of the plant. Each has been found to deliver potential benefits, so an ideal supplement will contain oil from both the sea buckthorn seed and berry.

A good recommended dose is 1,000MG of pure sea buckthorn. As always, look for a supplement with no added ingredients or fillers.

Some studies[21] have suggested a difference in nutrient analysis in sea buckthorn grown in different regions of the world. For this reason, a supplement with material sourced from the Himalayas is preferable.

 


  1. ^ Sabir, S. M., et al. “Elemental and nutritional analysis of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides ssp. turkestanica) berries of Pakistani origin.” Journal of medicinal food 8.4 (2005): 518-522.
  2. ^ Fatima, Tahira, et al. “Fatty acid composition of developing sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) berry and the transcriptome of the mature seed.” PLoS One 7.4 (2012): e34099.
  3. ^ Wang, Jiesi, et al. “Hypolipidaemic and hypoglycaemic effects of total flavonoids from seed residues of Hippophae rhamnoides L. in mice fed a high‐fat diet.” Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 91.8 (2011): 1446-1451.
  4. ^ Mozaffarian, Dariush, et al. “Trans-palmitoleic acid, metabolic risk factors, and new-onset diabetes in US adults: a cohort study.” Annals of internal medicine 153.12 (2010): 790-799.
  5. ^ Zadernowski, R., et al. “SEA‐BUCKTHORN LIPIDS.” Journal of Food Lipids 4.3 (1997): 165-172.
  6. ^ Zeb, Alam. “Important therapeutic uses of sea buckthorn (Hippophae): a review.” J Biol Sci 4.5 (2004): 687-693.
  7. ^ Pang, Xiufeng, et al. “Antihypertensive effect of total flavones extracted from seed residues of Hippophae rhamnoides L. in sucrose-fed rats.” Journal of Ethnopharmacology 117.2 (2008): 325-331.
  8. ^ Zhang, X., et al. “[Effect of total flavones of Hippophae rhamnoides L. on sympathetic activity in hypertension].” Hua xi yi ke da xue xue bao= Journal of West China University of Medical Sciences= Huaxi yike daxue xuebao/[bian ji zhe, Hua xi yi ke da xue xue bao bian wei hui] 32.4 (2001): 547-550.
  9. ^ Basu, M., et al. “Anti-atherogenic effects of seabuckthorn (Hippophaea rhamnoides) seed oil.” Phytomedicine 14.11 (2007): 770-777.
  10. ^ Yamori, Yukio, et al. “Dietary prevention of stroke and its mechanisms in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats–preventive effect of dietary fibre and palmitoleic acid.” Journal of hypertension. Supplement: official journal of the International Society of Hypertension 4.3 (1986): S449-52.
  11. ^ Mingyu, Xu, Sun Xiaoxuan, and Cui Jinhua. “The medicinal research and development of seabuckthorn.” J. Water Soil Conser. China(1991).
  12. ^ Cao, Haiming, et al. “Identification of a lipokine, a lipid hormone linking adipose tissue to systemic metabolism.” Cell 134.6 (2008): 933-944.
  13. ^ Wang, Jiesi, et al. “Hypolipidaemic and hypoglycaemic effects of total flavonoids from seed residues of Hippophae rhamnoides L. in mice fed a high‐fat diet.” Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 91.8 (2011): 1446-1451.
  14. ^ Lehtonen, Henna-Maria, et al. “Different berries and berry fractions have various but slightly positive effects on the associated variables of metabolic diseases on overweight and obese women.” European journal of clinical nutrition 65.3 (2011): 394-401.
  15. ^ Zeb, Alam. “Important therapeutic uses of sea buckthorn (Hippophae): a review.” J Biol Sci 4.5 (2004): 687-693.
  16. ^ Yang, Baoru, et al. “Effects of dietary supplementation with sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) seed and pulp oils on atopic dermatitis.” The Journal of nutritional biochemistry 10.11 (1999): 622-630.
  17. ^ Seven, Bedri, et al. “Hippophae rhamnoides L. and dexpanthenol-bepanthene on blood flow after experimental skin burns in rats using 133Xe clearance technique.” Hellenic journal of nuclear medicine 12.1 (2008): 55-58.
  18. ^ Gupta, Asheesh, et al. “A preclinical study of the effects of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) leaf extract on cutaneous wound healing in albino rats.” The international journal of lower extremity wounds 4.2 (2005): 88-92.
  19. ^ Chawla, Raman, et al. “Radioprotective and antioxidant activity of fractionated extracts of berries of Hippophae rhamnoides.” Journal of Medicinal Food 10.1 (2007): 101-109.
  20. ^ Yang, Baoru, et al. “Effects of dietary supplementation with sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) seed and pulp oils on atopic dermatitis.” The Journal of nutritional biochemistry 10.11 (1999): 622-630.
  21. ^ J Med Food. 2005 Winter;8(4):518-22. Elemental and nutritional analysis of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides ssp. turkestanica) Berries of Pakistani origin. Sabir SM, Maqsood H, Hayat I, Khan MQ, Khaliq A. Source University College of Agriculture, Rawalakot, Azad Kashmir, Pakistan.
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